Thursday, February 10, 2011

new (to me) films watched in 2011



A bit late and always a dollar short but I do love a good list.

Films Fatales 2011
1. Heathers (Michael Lehman, 1985)
2. National Lampoon's Animal House (John Landis, 1978)
3. The Spiral Staircase (Robert Siodmak, 1946)
4. Leave Her to Heaven (John M. Stahl, 1945)
5. Winter's Bone (Debra Granik, 2010)
6. Road to Morocco (David Butler, 1942)
7. The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (Fritz Lang, 1933)
8. Kid Auto Races at Venice (Henry Lehrman, 1914)
9. The Immigrant (Charles Chaplin, 1917)
10. One Week (Buster Keaton & Eddie Cline, 1920)
11. Romance Sentimentale (Grigori Alexsandrov & Sergei M. Eisenstein, 1930)
12. Limelight (Charles Chaplin, 1952)
13. The Property Man (Charles Chaplin, 1914)
14. A Night in the Show (Charles Chaplin, 1915)
15. Backstage (Roscoe Arbuckle, 1919)
16. The Playhouse (Buster Keaton & Eddie Cline, 1921)
17. Troubles of a Grasswidower (Max Linder, 1912)
18. The Tramp (Charles Chaplin, 1915)
19. The Pawnshop (Charles Chaplin, 1916)
20. Tango Tangles (Mack Sennett, 1914)
21. Dough and Dynamite (Charles Chaplin, 1914)
22. Neighbors (Buster Keaton & Eddie Cline, 1920)
23. The Saphead (Herbert Blache & Winchell Smith, 1920)
24. Our Hospitality (Buster Keaton & John G. Blystone, 1923)
25. Blow Out (Brian De Palma, 1981)
26. Land Without Bread (Luis Bunuel, 1933)
27. A Woman of Paris: A Drama of Pate (Charles Chaplin, 1923)
28. The Frozen North (Buster Keaton & Eddie Cline, 1922)
29. The General (Buster Keaton, 1925)
30. Parlor, Bedroom and Bath (Edward Sedgwick, 1931)
31. Allez Oop (Charles Lamont, 1934)
32. Jail Bait (Charles Lamont, 1937)
33. Monsieur Verdoux (Charles Chaplin, 1947)
34. Railrodder (Gerald Potterton, 1965)
35. A King in New York (Charles, Chaplin, 1957)
36. The Devil's Backbone (Guillermo Gel Toro, 2001)
37. The Blind Swordsman (Takeshi Kitano, 2003)
38. Electronic Labyrinth THX 1138 4EB (George Lucas, 1967)
39. The Halfmoon Files (Peter Scheffner, 2007)
40. District 9 (Neill Blomkamp, 2009)
41. History is Made at Night (Frank Borzage, 1937)
42. Pajama Party (Don Weis, 1964)
43. Eat Pray Love (Ryan Murphy, 2010)
44. Zelig (Woody Allen, 1983)
45. The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980)
46. Royal Wedding (Stanley Donen, 1951)
47. Sans Soleil (Chris Marker, 1982)
48. The Triplets of Belleville (Sylvain Chomet, 2003)
49. Tamara Drewe (Stephen Frears, 2010)
50. The Social Network (David Fincher, 2010)
51. Baby Blues (Lars Jacobson & Amardeep Kaleka, 2008)
52. Sex, Lies, and Videotape (Steven Soderbergh, 1989)
53. Never Let Me Go (Mark Romanek, 2010)
54. Girl, Interrupted (James Mangold, 1999)
55. Death of a Cyclist (Juan Antonio Bardem, 1955)
56. Lolita (Stanley Kubrick, 1962)
57. Bridesmaids (Paul Feig, 2011)
58. Donnie Darko (Richard Kelly, 2001)
59. Grizzly Man (Werner Herzog, 2005)
60. The Big Lebowski (Joel & Ethan Coen, 1998)
61. The Importance of Being Earnest (Oliver Parker, 2002)
62. Midnight in Paris (Woody Allen, 2011)
63. Cast Away (Robert Zemeckis, 2000)
64. Dogville (Lars Von Trier, 2004)
65. O Brother, Where Art Though? (Joel & Ethan Coen, 2000)
66. Lars and the Real Girl (Craig Gillespie, 2007)
67. The Hangover (Todd Phillips, 2009)
68. The Wrestler (Darron Aronofsky, 2008)
69. In the Bedroom (Todd Field, 2001)
70. Badlands (Terrence Malick, 1973)
71. Frida (Julie Taymor, 2002)
72. Heaven Can Wait (Ernst Lubitsch, 1943)
73. 49th Parallel (Powell & Pressburger, 1941)
74. The Princess Comes Across (William K. Howard, 1936)
75. Yolanda and the Thief (Vincente Minnelli, 1945)
76. Blue (Krzysztof Kieslowski, 1993)
77. Roger & Me (Michael Moore, 1989)
78. The Mirror (Andrei Tarkovsky, 1975)
79. Walkabout (Nicolas Roeg, 1971)
80. Captain America: The First Avenger (Joe Johnston, 2011)
81. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (David Yates, 2011)
82. Blow Up (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1966)
83. Pickpocket (Robert Bresson, 1959)
84. Hiroshima Mon Amour (Alain Resnais, 1959)
85. Ashes and Diamonds (Andrzej Wajda, 1958)
86. Xala (Ousmane Sembene, 1975)

10 comments:

  1. Whoa, I think I can count on one hand the movies I've watched so far this year. Ha.

    Leave Her to Heaven is amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. an ode to the glories of film classes and the many films they bringeth. ;) also helps that many of these are very short.

    oh my goodness isn't it?? gave me chills.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Where she's on the horse, with the ashes... Strangest scene ever; just amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  4. YES. And I can't quite put my finger on why. Is it the strange music? The way she's stoically flinging the ashes back and forth? It's just delightfully bizarre.

    ReplyDelete
  5. "What's your damage Heather?" I've always felt an affinity to this movie. So many quotable lines from it!

    ReplyDelete
  6. loved it! it's just so... very. I think it may be my favorite of the mean/privileged high school girl trio movies though it's been awhile since I've watched Clueless.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love Winter's Bone. What did you think about it?

    Out of all of the movies on your list, I only watched 2. :P Time to go to the library.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi Lindsay! I thought winter's bone did a fantastic job of creating atmosphere (though I could've done without some of the shots of squirrels etc which seemed more throw in than contributive to the overall feel of the film) and loved the striking characters in it (teardrop and merab, more specifically). I also think the boat scene was really well done. The things that it lacked for me were more character development aside from jennifer lawrence who I thought was great, and I'm also not crazy about the convoluted plot line in the vein of Brick but recognize that that wasn't really the main point. But overall I enjoyed it.

    Hey two's a start! :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Nice list! The Spiral Staircase is one I've been wanting to see for a while - what did you think of it?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Cee- I'm always up for a good 40s melodrama with creaky old mansions and ominous thunderstorms. Also GREAT cast. Elsa Lanchester is always a treat. Some of the freudian allusions were rather silly though it's always interesting to see the psychoanalytical preoccupations of the time come out in film (though Hitch's Spellbound is a better all around film in that vein, imo)

    ReplyDelete